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Nocturnal animals keep getting lost — and light pollution is to blame

Many nocturnal animal species use light from the moon and stars to migrate at night in search of food, shelter, or mates. But in our recent study, we uncovered how artificial light is disrupting these nightly migrations. Electric lighting is transforming our world. Around 80% of the global population now lives in places where night…

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Nocturnal animals keep getting lost — and light pollution is to blame

Many nocturnal animal species use light from the moon and stars to migrate at night in search of food, shelter, or mates. But in our recent study, we uncovered how artificial light is disrupting these nightly migrations. Electric lighting is transforming our world. Around 80% of the global population now lives in places where night skies are polluted with artificial light. A third of humanity can no longer see the Milky Way – the galaxy our solar system belongs to. But the light at night has deeper effects. In humans, nocturnal light pollution has been linked to sleep disorders, depression,… This story continues at The Next Web
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